Oatmeal Cookie Recipe with Raisins and Walnuts – Weight Watcher Cookies – 3 Points!

This skinny oatmeal cookie recipe is soft and chewy with the crunchy taste of walnuts and sweetness of raisins and sugar free maple syrup. At only 3 WW Smart points, it’s a real diet winner!These skinny oatmeal raisin cookies are only 70 calories and 3 WW Smart points each!

There is something about oatmeal cookies that screams comfort food to me.  I think it goes back to my early childhood when my mother made us oatmeal for breakfast in the fall and winter, and oatmeal cookies for an afternoon snack. 

Be sure to check out this list of healthy recipes if you are looking for more options for clean eating and weight loss recipes.

More oatmeal cookie recipes

Whatever the reason, it’s one of my favorite wholesome sweet treats now. Do you love oatmeal cookies as much as I do? Let’s make them! Here are a few other oatmeal recipes to try, as well.

Making this oatmeal cookie recipe

These chewy oatmeal raisin cookies have lots of great ingredients that make up their delightful flavor. Best of all, the cookies are light enough to include in any healthy eating plan, since they only have 70 calories!ingredients for these healthy oatmeal cookies

These cookies make a great breakfast on the go and a super snack.  They are filled with the goodness of old fashioned rolled oats, raisins and walnuts and the fat and sugar is kept at a minimum to still give a great taste.

Making skinny cookies like these is fun, knowing that when you are done, you will be able to indulge without feeling guilty. Best of all, they are very easy to make.

Ready in just minutes

If you find yourself itching for the taste of an oatmeal cookie, this version can be on the plate in just minutes. I just whisked my dry ingredients together first. Then creamed the wet ingredients, folded in the dry and added the oats, nuts and raisins.Making oatmeal cookies

It took less than 15 minutes. Using a small cupcake scoop makes it easy to get the dough onto the baking sheet and in the oven. There is no need to even flatten them.  This mounded shape is what makes them nice and soft!Oatmeal cookies, ready to bake

How do I keep these cookies so light in calories?

The trick to keeping the calories so low on these healthy oatmeal raisin cookies is making the right substitutes. Most of the calories in cookies comes from fat and sugar. 

This chewy oatmeal cookie recipe only adds 2 tablespoons of butter.  In place of the butter that would normally be in an oatmeal cookie, I use 1/3 cup of applesauce. This saves a ton of calories but still keeps the cookie moist.Soft chewy oatmeal cookies

You will see many healthy oatmeal cookie recipes that ask you to replace refined sugar with maple syrup. While this does make the cookie more healthy, it doesn’t save on calories. Any type of sugar is high in calories.

To offset this, I use only 1/3 cup of sugar and then use Log Cabin sugar free maple syrup.  It adds the sweetness that the cookie needs without the calories that pure maple syrup would give them.

I also keep both the nuts and raisins to 1/3 cup each.  Both nuts and dried fruits are very calorie dense, so they should be used sparingly if counting calories is your aim.  There are enough to give the taste and texture in each bite though.

Why do oatmeal cookies have traditionally raisins in them?

Oatmeal cookies with raisins first appeared in the Fannie Farmer Cookbook of 1896. (affiliate link)  The oatmeal cookie descended from the Scottish oatcake and eventually American cookies improved the recipe by adding raisins.Chewy oatmeal cookies

Oatmeal raisins cookies are one of the most popular cookies in the USA now. There is even a National Oatmeal Cookie day on April 30!

After Fannie Farmer’s cookie appeared, the oatmeal raisin cookie started becoming more prominent in the early 1900.  It is thought of as a healthy food because of the fiber and vitamins that the recipe contains.  Even though we think of it as a “healthy cookie,” the normal version still has nutritional value similar to a chocolate chip cookie unless you make substitutes to slim it down somehow.

How do these chewy oatmeal raisin cookies taste?

In a word – YUM!  These tasty cookies are soft and chewy with a hint of sweetness that is very satisfying and an extra wholesome flavor that comes from the old fashioned oats.  They have a light crunch from the walnuts and the raisins give them a lovely texture.

I like the softness of the cookie.  Since I used a small cookie scoop for the batter, the dough starts off in a little ball and doesn’t settle much which gives it a nice soft texture that is delightful.

Nutritional Value for these oatmeal raisin nut cookies

These cookies are a boon for those watching their weight. Each cookie has only 70 calories, with just 0.6 grams of saturated fat and only 3.5 grams of sugar. They are gluten free and have only 3 WW Smart points for each cookie (2 cookies are just 5 WW points!) so they can easily fit into any diet plan.oatmeal cookies on a baking rack

The cookies are low in sodium and have 11 grams of carbs.

Would you like a reminder for this oatmeal cookie recipe with raisins and walnuts?  Just pin this image to one of your cooking boards on Pinterest so that you can easily find it later.This Skinny oatmeal raisin cookie has only 70 calories and 3 WW smart points!

Yield: 30 cookies

Oatmeal Cookie Recipe with Raisins and Walnuts - Weight Watcher Cookies - 3 Points!

Oatmeal Cookie Recipe with Raisins and Walnuts - Weight Watcher Cookies  - 3 Points!
This easy oatmeal cookie recipe is soft and chewy with the crunchy taste of walnuts and sweetness of raisins and maple syrup. At only 3 WW Smart points, it's a real diet winner!
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 1/4 cups old fashioned rolled oats (check your label to make sure they are gluten free)
  • 1/3 cup raisins
  • 1/3 cup walnuts, chopped
  • 1/2 cup Log Cabin sugar free maple syrup

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 º F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon. Whisk well.
  4. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream together butter and sugar. Add the egg, then the Log Cabin maple syrup, applesauce and vanilla extract.
  5. Turn the mixer to the lowest speed and gradually add the flour mixture until just combined.
  6. Stir in the oats, raisins and chopped walnuts.
  7. Use a small muffin scoop to drop spoonfuls of the oat mixture onto the prepared baking sheets.
  8. Bake for 12-15 minutes until the cookies just start to brown on the edges.
  9. Allow to cool for 3-4 minutes and then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely..
  10. Store these chewy oatmeal cookies in an air tight container on the counter. The cookies can also be frozen for up to 3 months.

Notes

Nutritional information is approximate due to natural variation in ingredients and the cook-at-home nature of our meals.

1 cookie is 3 WW Smart Points. 2 cookies are 5 WW Smart points. The cookies can be made with pure maple syrup instead of the sugar free variety but this adds calories and changes the point value for Weight Watchers.

Nutrition Information

Yield

30

Serving Size

1 cookie

Amount Per Serving Calories 70 Total Fat 2g Saturated Fat 0.6g Unsaturated Fat 1.3g Cholesterol 8.3mg Sodium 78.7mg Carbohydrates 11g Fiber 0.9g Sugar 3.5g Protein 1.6g

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are "affiliate links." This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive a small commission, but the price will be the same for you. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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